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MSR

MSR Remote 3 Mountaineering Tent

MSR Remote 3 Mountaineering Tent

£764.00 £955.00
20% off

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As the name would suggest, the Remote 3 is a mountaineering, expedition and harsh alpine aimed tent designed to withstand abuse that no normal tent would even consider looking in the direction of. 

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Description

Season : 2019W OFFER

Code : 09542

Weight : 0KG

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The Remote 3 is designed to house you in conditons that would give normal tents a nervous sweat. Mountaineering, harsh alpine conditions, expeditions, heavy snowfall and fierce winds are all in a days work for this shelter.

The key to the Remote 3's exceptional durability is MSR's fabric choice and pole layout. At high altitudes (as you'll most likely know if you've found this tent), snowfall changes in an instant and can't be the fundemantal factor which prevents your ascent. The Remote features three intercepting poles which cross at the peak of the tent; not only does this allow heavy snowfall to rest comfortably, but also resists strong winds and general mountainous abuse. Often while in Alpine conditions the wind won't just batter you from the sides, it will rise over the peak of the nearest mountain and will put pressure on the top of the tent, meaning a strong pole design is fundemental to a mountain tent. It isn't just the pole design which allows this strength, a lot is down to MSR's reinforced Easton Syclone Poles which are far stronger than poles used in their backpacking and lighter tents. Further contributing towards the overall strength of this tent are reinforced guy-out points to provide tension in strong winds and a durable DuraShield fabric to resist heavy rain and snowfall. If you dive deep into the specs of this tent, you may also notice that the flysheet of the Remote is polyester rather than nylon; this is due to UV radiation. Nylon, although incredibly durable, degrates heavily due to UV rays, whereas polyester doesn't, making it the perfect fabric to use on a tent which could be sat in the same position for weeks at a time. 

Space has to be another prime consideration on any expedition focused tent; who wants to spend days, even weeks in a coffin shaped tent? The Remote features over a metre of headroom (more than enough for an adult male to sit upright), and just under two metres of internal width to house three users comfortably. Two large porches are provided, one of which is slightly bigger than the other which means you may have to fight over it.

MSR's Remote isn't all about performance, some aspects such as user friendliness are a huge priority when deprived of oxygen and daydreaming of your next meal. Colour coded poles make it quick and easy to setup, taking around 10 minutes in total with a bit of practice. When you do come to set it up, you'll also appreciate the well thought out snow flaps which prevent spindrift. 

If a standard tent just won't cut it, or you're planning an expedition to a snow-capped peak in alpine conditions, the Remote is the ideal choice and acts as your sanctuary of safety when the weather says otherwise. 

  • Ultra tough, almost indesctructible poles
  • Tough DuraShield waterproof outer fabric
  • Bathtub floor
  • Two internal pockets
  • Refective guylines
  • Colour coded poles
  • Pole layout allows heavy snow to rest
  • Dual vestibules
  • Dual entry
Care & Advice

How to Care for Your Tent

We know that purchasing a tent is a big investment, that’s why we have such a wide range of options to suit different activities, weather conditions and people, allowing you to choose the perfect one for you. Taking care of your brand new tent can be the difference between heading out for an adventure in the mountains, or having to fork out for a hefty repair bill, or even worse, another replacement tent. Below are our best tips to care for your tent.

Footprint

Before even leaving the shop (or online basket) with your tent, consider a footprint. A footprint is a large water-resistant piece of material which sits underneath your tent to protect it from sharp rocks and wet ground; if this footprint gets damaged, it’s easy to replace and doesn’t cost a fortune; if your tent groundsheet gets damaged, you’ll have to spend at least twice the amount for a repair or replacement.

Don’t Abuse the Poles

The chances are your poles are made from individual aluminium sections connected by elastic; when you come to remove the poles from the tent, don’t pull them out. The best way to remove poles from their sleeve is to place the pole end against your hip and pull the fabric towards you. If you simply attempt to pull the pole out, they’ll disconnect inside, the elastic will stretch and then spring back, potentially trapping the fabric of your tent between the pole sections.

You might also be tempted to flick the poles out so that the elastic snaps them into place in a quickfire fashion. However, this is far from ideal, as if the poles don’t align when they meet, you can easily damage or weaken the end of the pole, leading to future failure which is usually on the wettest and windiest nights!

Collapse Poles From the Centre

When your poles are safely removed from the sleeve, collapse them from the centre to avoid stretching the elastic.

Stuff, Don’t Fold

You were probably told when you were in the Scouts or doing the Duke of Edinburgh Award that the best way to pack your tent away is to neatly fold it into a rectangle, the width of your storage bag, roll it around the poles and pegs and then put it all in the stuffsack. However, whilst very neat and tidy, this method of packing can create permanent creases in the fabric, weaken the waterproofing and eventually split the fabric of your tent. The best solution is to simply stuff the tent fabric into the storage bag, just like you would a sleeping bag, and pack the poles separately. Make sure to leave and end or corner at the top, so that you can easily peg it out if your next campsite is windy. The poles normally have their own stuffsack so they can be packed separately, strapped to the outside of your pack or stored inside, allowing the tent fabric to be compressed for efficient packing.

Store it Dry

Let’s assume you’ve been out with your tent and the weather has been a little on the damp side. You’ve packed your tent away when wet and now you’re back home in the warm and dry with a nice of cup of tea reflecting on your latest adventure. But what about your poor soggy tent? The worst thing you can do is to leave it packed away wet, mildew will grow and eventually rot the tent, rendering it useless. As soon as you’ve finished that cup of tea, wipe off any excess dirt and moisture with a towel, then hang the tent somewhere where it can fully air out; a nice warm spare room or a garage is perfect. Alternatively, when it stops raining, pitch the tent outside in the sunshine to dry off. Let it air for at least 24 hours and once you are sure that it is bone dry it can be packed away for storage. Note - don’t tumble dry or hang the tent over a radiator or other direct heat source.

Don’t Store in the Stuffsack

Like your sleeping bag, it’s best not to store your sleeping bag in its stuffsack unless it has to be compressed for an activity. Leave it in a large duffel bag or supermarket ‘bag for life’ in a cool, well ventilated area so it can breathe.

Avoid Tree Sap

If you’ve ever had sap on your hands, you’ll know how horrible and sticky the stuff is; it’s even harder to remove from your tent flysheet. Pitch away from trees if possible.

Don’t Leave in the Sun

The majority of tents we stock are made from nylon. Nylon is incredibly tough, lightweight and easy to care for, however it will naturally degrade if left out in harsh sunlight for extended periods of time. Try to pitch your tent in the shade or strike the tent (pack it away) during the day. Polyester tents don’t suffer from this quite as badly, but it’s still a good habit to get into.

Leave Sharp Objects Outside

Boots, cooking equipment and other sharp/abrasive objects can all be stored in the vestibule, where there is less chance of it ripping a hole in your fly or groundsheet. You may not want to pop your pet in there, but at least carry a small blanket to avoid their claws damaging your groundsheet.

Technical Information

Technical Information

Minimum weight: 3.56kg

Packed weight: 3.88kg

Number of poles: 4

Number of doors: 2

Rainfly fabric: 68D ripstop polyester, 1800mm polyurethane and DWR

Canopy fabric: 40D ripstop nylon

Mesh type: 15D nylon mesh

Floor fabric: 40D ripstop nylon

Sizing Information

Floor size: 4.3 square metres

Vent volume: 3171 litres

Packed size: 51 x 20cm

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MSR Remote 3 Mountaineering Tent

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The product I bought was competitively priced. The video demonstration of the product assisted me in my decision to purchase the item and was very informative, as it showed all of the features and the fit. I chose "click and collect" which was an efficient and quick process. I would definitely shop here again.

Amanda  •   19 Jan 2019.

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